Archive for the ‘CSA’ Category

Week two: greens mostly

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

I picked up the share early Saturday morning. A very atmospheric scene with threatening weather and Boulder Creek very high.

  1. A big bag of mixed salad greens.
  2. An equal amount of beautiful spinach.
  3. More killer turnips, very small ones this time.
  4. Radishes! Small and luminously beautiful, they are already gone but were indescribably delicious.
  5. My lagniappe: snap peas. As sweet as candy, only a few made it into a salad – the rest were devoured immediately.

Nothing fancy this week, there is a wedding to contend with! I imagine all of this will end up in salads, but we might have to fob off some of the greens to unsuspecting relatives to avoid waste.

Week one: greens, glorious greens

Monday, June 7th, 2010

As is well-known, early season at most Farmer’s markets means greens. And more greens. Black Cat Farms assembles the CSA shares beforehand, but each week there is a little lagniappe, an empty bag to fill with anything that is available.

The first CSA share:

  1. A large bag of beautiful “mesclun,” a diverse mix of various salad greens. Including beautiful edible flowers.
  2. A similar quantity of mixed braising greens.
  3. Non-greens! Killer white turnips.
  4. My lagniappe: arugula.

The four beautiful turnips were clearly doled out to a greens-weary audience, but the greens are quite abundant; it will be a bit of a challenge for 2-3 people to eat it all in a week.

I was happy to pick up the first dozen eggs of the season from Wisdom’s Natural Poultry, and that suggested Oeufs de Meurette for dinner. Perfect with roast turnips. And a big mixed-green salad, of course!

Welcome to bcofresh v2.0

Saturday, June 5th, 2010

Buy local. Cook one dish. Share recipe.

Looking back, bcofresh was so 2008. “Locavore” and “Slow Food” were new ideas to many, and everyone was reading Michael Pollan and visiting the Farmer’s Market, often for the first time. bcofresh was envisioned as a form of discipline for the writer, a protocol for staying true to local ingredients instead of succombing to far more convenient options. By and large this was successful, and bcofresh did manage to deliver a new ingredient and recipe every week for an entire season.

Now “farm-to-table” is all the rage and carefully curated local food is ubiquitous. Grocery stores increasingly blur the line between local/organic and conventional food, but it still stands to reason that a local farmer is the best source for local food. Farmer’s markets are the obvious source, but Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) shares are an increasingly popular way to buy local food direct from the farmer. Some advantages to both farmer and consumer are obvious, but many interesting questions about confronting a weekly box of seasonal food are rarely addressed. Is a share a better deal that an equivalent amount of food purchased from the Farmer’s market? Can the food be consumed without waste? Will the bounty in a particular week be diverse enough to please?

bcofresh v2.0 will address these burning questions as it chronicles a weekly CSA share from Black Cat Farm in Boulder, Colorado.